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Is Your Vibrator Causing Dead Vagina Syndrome?

by | Jul 27, 2022 | Sexual & Reproductive Health

Can excessive vibrator use desensitise your vagina?

 

We’re all guilty of engaging in a little (or a lot of) female pleasure whenever the urge strikes, and unashamedly so! There’s nothing wrong with a little solo exploration of the female nether regions to reach orgasm. Like all good explorations, it’s important to take the right equipment. And in this case, we’re talking about every girls favourite sex toy; the vibrator.

When it comes to shaking things up in the bedroom, you have to admit the vibrator is an absolute game-changer. Whether it’s solo or partnered play, no other form of sexual activity can deliver the mind-blowing sexual stimulation on par with those satisfyingly good vibrations – they really know how to keep a vagina alive!

But, can excessive vibrator use desensitise your vagina in what’s commonly known as dead vagina syndrome?

If you’re one to dabble in a marathon session with your trusty vibrator every now and then, you may be familiar with experiencing numbness of the vagina. Turns out, numbness of the female nether regions is known as dead vagina syndrome (DVS), and it’s caused by an overuse of your vibrator (no judgement here).

The theory behind dead vagina syndrome claims that prolonged vibrator use has the potential to damage sensitive nerves around the clitoris and in the vagina, leading to a loss of sensitivity (kind of like an overstimulation injury). Over time, excessive use of a vibrator can supposedly prevent you from reaching orgasm.

So, is dead vagina syndrome a real scientific syndrome? Or is the DVS claim absolutely false?

We have it on good authority that if you’re a woman who loves their fair share of vibrational pleasure, you have no reason to worry about being medically diagnosed with dead vagina syndrome.

Dead vagina syndrome is not a real thing! It’s likely one of those nonsense medical conditions created on the Internet (aka fake news).

This paper published in 2005 suggests that post-vibrator desensitisation lasts for less than an hour. While this 2009 study found that over 70% of women using vibrators did not experience any genital side effects, with vibrator use showing positive signs of improving sexual function (though further research is required).

At the end of the day, if you’re experiencing vaginal numbness after a lengthy session with your favourite wand, simply press pause on the sexual fun and give yourself time to recover. If vaginal numbness persists for longer than what you consider to be normal, or is accompanied by any form of pain, it’s a good idea to consult with your doctor or ob-gyn for an assessment.

Overall, vibrator use delivers more good than harm for women who are open to embracing it.

 

What are the health benefits of using a vibrator?

Sex toys and vibrators play a vital role in normal sexual function for many women, enabling benefits of:

Stress relief

Whether you live with chronic stress or the occasional bout of anxiety, using a vibrator to the point of orgasm is a great way to get the feel-good hormones flowing. So, don’t hesitate in giving vibrator time a permanent slot in your daily wind down routine. We are totally here for it.

Not only will endorphins reduce stress, but they’ll also relieve pain and make you feel more comfortable. That’s why it’s a good idea to masturbate when you have your period (if you haven’t tried masturbation to relieve period pain and cramps, what are you waiting for?).

Better sex and improved sensitivity

Many women notice that when using their vibrator in daily life, it helps them to work out what turns them on, thus improving their overall sex life, whether solo or with a partner.

And by whipping out those vibrational weapons of sexual destruction, you’re also increasing the sensitivity of your lady parts for longer lasting intercourse.

 

More orgasms

Most women can’t reach orgasm through penetration alone, no matter how hard they (and their sexual partners) try.

According to research, most women notice a greater likelihood of achieving orgasm through clitoral stimulation as opposed to vaginal penetration. They need direct clitoral stimulation to get the orgasmic juices flowing. While the tongue, hands, and penis can feel great, the chance of reaching orgasm significantly improved with the help of a vibrator.

 

Reduced depression and anxiety symptoms

Women living with depression and anxiety can sometimes have a low libido. Using sex toys can help to improve female libido, increase energy, and help achieve more orgasms, which in turn reduce anxiety. It’s what we’re coining the circle of your sex life.

 

Treatment for vaginismus

Vaginismus is a poorly understood condition affecting 1-7% of women worldwide, most commonly between the age of 26 and 35.

Vaginismus causes women to feel pain when the vagina is penetrated, whether that’s through sexual intercourse, tampon use, or an ob-gyn appointment. Yet, research shows vibrator use can help to ease the penetrative pain by providing a relaxing effect on the pelvic muscles.

 

Improved sex life for women post menopause

As women age, they may need extra sexual stimulation to increase the sensations experienced during sex and to reach orgasm. Often, vibrators can be the sexual tool of choice to deliver that extra stimulation.

That’s because the clitoris is designed with receptors that specifically respond to vibration.

Vibrating stimulation can also increase blood flow and natural lubrication, and maintain elasticity of vaginal tissues. Forget Botox – it seems a sex toy is the best way to keep your lady parts young.

Stay on top of your sexual health and have your monthly birth control pills delivered to your door with Youly’s hassle-free health care.


Sources

Herbenick, Debra et al. “Prevalence and characteristics of vibrator use by women in the United States: results from a nationally representative study.” The journal of sexual medicine vol. 6,7 (2009): 1857-66. doi:10.1111/j.1743-6109.2009.01318.x

Rullo, Jordan E et al. “Genital vibration for sexual function and enhancement: best practice recommendations for choosing and safely using a vibrator.” Sexual and relationship therapy : journal of the British Association for Sexual and Relationship Therapy vol. 33,3 (2018): 275-285. doi:10.1080/14681994.2017.1419558

Tommerdahl, M et al. “Human vibrotactile frequency discriminative capacity after adaptation to 25 Hz or 200 Hz stimulation.” Brain research vol. 1057,1-2 (2005): 1-9. doi:10.1016/j.brainres.2005.04.031

Pacik, Peter T. “Vaginismus: review of current concepts and treatment using botox injections, bupivacaine injections, and progressive dilation with the patient under anesthesia.” Aesthetic plastic surgery vol. 35,6 (2011): 1160-4. doi:10.1007/s00266-011-9737-5

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